How To Hack / Find Saved WiFi Passwords In Android Smartphone Using Terminal App

Android smartphone doesn’t support viewing of saved or stored Wi-Fi passwords on it. While you can easily view saved WiFi passwords on Windows. Sometimes, you may want to share your Wi-Fi password with your friend but you can’t remember it and you have password saved on your phone. Since Android doesn’t allow viewing of saved passwords, you can’t simply view the passwords stored on your phone. 

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This tutorial shows you how to find and view stored/saved Wi-Fi passwords on your Android smartphone using android terminal emulator app. To use this tutorial, your phone must be rooted.

In this tutorial we will install a ‘Terminal Emulator‘ app on Android smartphone so that we can run linux commands on Android smartphone.

How To View Stored Wi-Fi Passwords On Your Android Smartphone Using Terminal App On Phone?

Step 1

First, we have to install ‘Terminal Emulator‘ App for Android on smartphone. Open Play Store app on your phone.

     

Step 2

In Play Store search for terminal and tap on any app to install. Any of the terminal app would do the job.

Tap on INSTALL to install the app. Tap on ACCEPT when it asks for permission.

    

Terminal Emulator for Android will be downloaded and installed on your phone. Tap on OPEN to open the app.

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Step 3

Now, you will see a command line window opened on your Android smartphone.

We are going to need Root Level Access to view system files. So first, we will switch to super user via terminal.

Type following command and press ENTER.

su root

You will see a popup asking to grant terminal emulator superuser permissions. Tap on GRANT to continue.

You will see a toast message saying, “Terminal Emulator has been granted superuser permissions for an interactive shell“. Now we have Root Level Access.

Step 4

Now, after getting superuser permissions, go to “/data/misc/wifi” path and list directory content using following commands.

cd /data/misc/wifi
ls

The “wpa_supplicant.conf” file contains all Wi-Fi network saved passwords and other information. WPA in the name means encryption used is WPA. It may be WEP in some cases. The filename will be “wep_supplicant.conf” in that case. We need to open “wpa_supplicant.conf” file to view saved Wi-Fi passwords in your android smartphone using terminal emulator. Type following command and press ENTER.

cat wpa_supplicant.conf

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Step 5

Terminal emulator will display content of “wpa_supplicant.conf” file. You can see all your saved Wi-Fi network passwords here.

Note down your password and close terminal app.

You have successfully found Wi-Fi passwords stored on your Android smartphone. You need to make sure that you have Rooted your phone before trying this. Please note that Rooting your phone may void your device’s Warranty. Check this link for tutorial on rooting android phone using KingRoot app. Watch video for more help.

How To View Stored Wi-Fi Passwords On Your Android Smartphone Using Terminal App On Phone?

About Aslam Khan

Hi there, I am a blogger, engineer and a computer geek. I love kittens. I spend some of my time blogging besides full time job as Senior Windows Administrator. I like to learn new things.

One comment

  1. You got yourself a new follower.

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